AcademicsGraduate Schools

School of Letters

  • Master's Program
  • Doctoral Program

Open and Accessible Research and Learning at the Global Level, Combining Tradition with Innovation

The Graduate School of Letters offers courses in the traditional disciplines of history and Japanese and English literature as well as courses in newer, broad-based research and methodologies such as civilization studies, communications and tourism, within a structure that is designed to promote scholarly interaction. This unique approach avoids the pitfalls of specialization and segmentation while actively encouraging in-depth research and learning in a range of different forms. It also enables a variety of joint initiatives in conjunction with the Undergraduate School of Letters and the Undergraduate School of Tourism. It is important that our research and learning be open and accessible at the global level. To this end, both students and instructors are encouraged to participate in international exchange programs. Likewise, the structured yet flexible curriculum and organization is designed to provide graduates with the foundations to become active contributors at the global level.

Note: Details are subject to change.

Course of Civilization Studies

  • Doctoral Programs
    (first half and second half)

A Comprehensive Study of Civilizations that Spans Multiple Fields

Overview

The Course of Civilization Studies provides an introduction to the theory and methodology of civilization studies, and uses this to explore a range of discrete topics including ideology, culture, language, artistic expression, religion, ethnicity, social structures and history. The emphasis is on providing a comprehensive grounding in each topic area to allow professional research, while at the same time investigating new issues and arguments and promoting discussion and debate across multiple research fields. This approach to educational research is designed to produce exceptionally talented graduates who are equipped with advanced specialist skills and expertise, as well as a broad outlook on life and the ability to use their knowledge and expertise to contribute to modern society.

Admission Policy

Applicants must demonstrate a commitment to self-motivated study and an appreciation of the learning objectives of the Course of Civilization Studies, namely, to produce humans who are capable of exhibiting their own skills in modern society as exceptionally talented people and as independent researchers and specialists with solid foundations and who are also equipped with a frame of reference regarding to civilization that transcends specialist domains, on the basis of a curriculum that is comprehensive and expansive yet at the same time predicated on the key learning outcomes.

Key Research Topics

  • A study of diversity in 21st-century civilization
  • Issues with research on global awareness in ancient times—Focusing on a study on global awareness of the ancient Mayan civilization
  • Revisiting Magritte: subject and representation
  • Ferdinand de Saussure: between basic linguistics and anagram studies

Course of History

  • Doctoral Programs
    (first half and second half)

A Comprehensive Examination of a Broad Sweep of Human History

Overview

The Course of History is divided into four components: Japanese, Eastern, Western and Ancient History. With the addition of archeology to the three traditional historical literature courses, the Course of History provides a comprehensive exploration of human history covering a range of topics. The Japanese history component, for instance, explores diplomatic relations; the Eastern history component focuses on Central Asia; the Western history component concentrates on the Mediterranean region; and the Ancient history component explores ancient history in countries other than Japan. The complementary interaction between the four academic domains is augmented by joint initiatives involving students and instructors from other graduate schools and courses within Tokai University, as well as a joint agreement with 11 other graduate courses (Course of History) that allows students to audit courses. In this way, the Course of History encourages students to adopt a global perspective and flexibility of doctrine.

Admission Policy

Applicants must demonstrate a commitment to self-motivated study and an appreciation of the learning objectives of the Course of History. Namely, the objective of this course is to equip graduates with the skills required to engage in historical research, based on a curriculum designed to foster a comprehensive exploration of human history that includes archeology while avoiding an overreliance on the historical literature. Its design also encourages active exchange of ideas with students within the course and other graduate schools. At the same time, the course encourages students to adopt a broad outlook with a global perspective and flexibility of doctrine and without being constrained by narrow research domains.

Key Research Topics

  • The Taisho political crisis and the Constitutional Party of Political Friends
  • Leadership strategies of non-Han citizens under the Sogi regime
  • Preservation of religious traditions in North Africa in the Late Antiquity period
  • Terracotta cake studies
  • Population movement and relocation in the Hokumo region

Course of Japanese Literature

  • Doctoral Programs
    (first half and second half)
  • Japanese Literature Research Program — first half of doctoral program
    Japanese Language Tuition Program — first half of doctoral program

Comprehensive Training for Japanese Literature and Language Researchers and Japanese Language Instructors

Overview

The Course of Japanese Literature is divided into two components: Japanese literature studies and Japanese language teaching. The Japanese literature studies component teaches both generalized and specialized research skills in the domain of Japanese literature and language for the next generation of researchers and educators as well as educators in high-level teaching roles. The Japanese language teaching component equips graduates with the knowledge and techniques to teach Japanese language to students for whome Japanese is not a first language. A combination of practical teaching workshops and volunteer work with international students provides graduates with the tools to become Japanese education researchers and outstanding Japanese teachers equipped with both theoretical knowledge and practical classroom skills.

Admission Policy

Applicants must demonstrate a commitment to self-motivated study and an appreciation of the learning objectives of the Course of Japanese Literature, namely, to equip graduates with specialized knowledge and education. More specifically, in the Japanese literature studies component, graduates will either become specialized researchers of Japanese literature / Japanese language research, humans with the capacity to contribute to the propagation of Japanese literature / Japanese language research in society, outstanding instructors of Japanese literature, or humans with the knowledge and capabilities to contribute internationally. In the Japanese language teaching component, graduates will become outstanding researchers and practical teachers of the Japanese language.

Key Research Topics

Japanese literature studies component

  • Studying the Chronicles of Japan — with a particular focus on Iitoyoaono-himemiko in the 15th chapter —
  • Reading Riichi Yokomitsu's Shanghai — A miniature map of the world and the future—

Japanese language teaching component

  • Study of Interactions at the contact situations to different cultures
  • Speech perception and teaching techniques in Japanese and the mother tongue

Course of English Literature

  • Doctoral Programs
    (first half and second half)

Nurturing Experts in English Language / British and American Literature and Outstanding English Language Educators

Overview

The Course of English Literature equips graduates with a broad understanding of the English language and British and American literature to nurture specialists in those fields. The British and American Literature component of the course explores a wide range of modern literature, while the English Language component investigates the Anglo-Saxon origins of the language along with in-depth linguistic analysis of English as it is spoken today. Graduates will acquire a theoretical and practical understanding of English teaching, communications, applied linguistics and cognitive linguistics. This study will prepare them for rewarding careers centered on instruction in the English language.

Admission Policy

Applicants must demonstrate a commitment to self-motivated study and an appreciation of the learning objectives of the Course of English Literature, namely, to equip graduates with practical skills in the education space by providing a broad academic understanding and appreciation of other languages and cultures along with specialized expertise in British and American Literature, the English language, English language teaching, or communications.

Key Research Topics

  • A Study of Alice's Adventure in Wonderland –The Rhetorical Survey of “Hatter"-
  • The Dichotomy of English Classrooms; Grammar through Communication
  • The Semantic and Syntactic properties of the present Subjunctive in English

Course of Communications

  • Doctoral Programs
    (first half and second half)
  • Media Studies Component
    Sociology Component
    Clinical Psychology Component

High-level Research Combining Media, Sociology and Clinical Psychology

Overview

The Course of Communications provides a highly advanced and specialized understanding of the art of communication as a foundation for further research or for a career in the field. It consists of three interlinked components: media studies, sociology and clinical psychology. The Media Studies component looks at the functions of the various different media used for communication along with associated outcomes; the Sociology component explores issues around the notion of society as a collection of people engaged in communication; and the Clinical Psychology component investigates the personal motives and motivations that drive communication, and each component will nurture specialists in each respective field.

Admission Policy

Applicants must demonstrate a commitment to self-motivated study and an appreciation of the learning objectives of the Course of Communications under a structured curriculum that links three components: Media Studies, which concentrates on the functions of the various different media and how they are used to communicate ideas and information; Sociology, which explores issues around the notion of society as a collection of people engaged in communication; and Clinical Psychology, which investigates the personal motives and motivations that drive communication.

Key Research Topics

  • Study of dealing with interpersonal conflict during adolescence and the impact on the adaptive state
  • The correlation between control, self-awareness and emotion in conformist attitudes and emotional expression
  • How junior high school students deal with interpersonal conflict and self-esteem in friendship impacts absenteeism

Course of Tourism

  • Master's Program
  • Master's Program only

Comprehensive Examination of Tourism for Application to Modern Society

Overview

The Course of Tourism (master's program) seeks to build an understanding of the phenomenon of tourism in the context of human and social behavior patterns. This understanding provides the foundation for an exploration of the application of the phenomenon of tourism in modern society. Tourism studies is a broad discipline that encompasses a wide range of areas including tourism resources (both natural and cultural), cross-cultural interaction, regional communities, domestic and international economics, operators in the tourism industry, and leisure activities. The Tourism course covers theoretical and practical approaches to broad theoretical studies of human endeavor as well as sociology, socioeconomics and business management through research subjects dedicated to the application thereof to tourism, and these then provide the basis for practical subjects where graduates take the initiative in both learning and research. The two-year master's program is designed to prepare graduates for careers as professionals at national and local government bodies in tourism and regional development, or as researchers at, for example, private-sector think tanks, or as pure researchers. To this end, the master's program equips graduates with the ability to identify and address key issues based on complex knowledge and insight, the ability to communicate effectively on the global stage, and the ability to conceptualize, utilize and apply their academic understandings to real-life situations in industry.

Admission Policy

Applicants must demonstrate a commitment to self-motivated study and an appreciation of the learning objectives of the Course of Tourism, namely, to acquire the ability to identify and address key issues, the ability to communicate effectively in multiple languages, the ability to conceptualize, utilize and apply scholarly understandings to a variety of real-life settings and thus engage in a comprehensive, academic study of tourism. In particular, they should be committed to developing the skills necessary to conduct research into tourism and the service industry and to providing leadership in the application of their research outcomes to industry as either pure researchers or advanced specialists.